joining the choir, SATB choir, Uncategorized

All About That Bass: Life in LVM by Alex White

Having previously sung in a choir and barbershop during my school years, it wasn’t until after university that I decided to pick up singing again. After a quick ‘google search’ for choirs in Leeds I found Leeds Vocal Movement and decided to inquire and maybe give it a shot.

Rosa was very welcoming and after one rehearsal I was hooked! And after sticking with it, to this day we have covered multiple genres and emotive music led by our very enthusiastic conductor Caitlin.

Leeds Vocal Movement singing led by Caitlin

Personally I think it is great to do some midweek singing and get rid of the stresses of the day. I always feel more refreshed the next day. It runs like any society would at university with multiple socials throughout the year and the pub after rehearsal. Can safely say it is worth it!

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Musings of a Conductor’s Apprentice by Gregory Moor

I have never considered myself to be a singer, but have always enjoyed performing and being involved in music in any way I can. My first instrument is the flute, which I took to grade 8, but I’ve always felt it to be a solo instrument so I then moved to the trumpet. I took this as far as grade 3 and officially stopped lessons as a result of family circumstances, but I loved how loud the trumpet was compared to the flute. It was also my way in to the local concert bands and ignited my passion for community. I studied music at university and there I picked up the French horn. I was always eager to be involved in bands and orchestras, so when the opportunity came to start conducting I couldn’t wait! I became conductor of the Leeds University Union Music Society (LUUMS) Concert Band and studied conducting under the guidance of Eduardo Portal.

After graduating, conducting opportunities came few and far between, so when I saw the advert to conduct Leeds Vocal Movement I got an application in as soon as I could. Looking into them, they appeared to have a great community built around singing in a relaxed environment which really appealed to me. I found out after the audition that I wasn’t going to be leading the choir and that was fine by me, I’ve never considered myself to be a singer after all. Months later, I got a call asking if I wanted to try a new role for LVM as apprentice conductor.

When I first arrived, the role was very much in its infancy. There were ideas for how the role would look, but as I was to be the first to fill the role I got to find out what worked and similarly what didn’t. Since I’d never had much experience with singing, I wasn’t particularly comfortable warming up voices, so I was very glad to have more of a back seat and learn techniques from Caitlin in more of a participatory manner. The Kodaly method Caitlin uses to warm LVM up is perfect as it encourages the singers to learn the fundamentals of music theory practically. The effects of this were really noticeable when taking sectionals since it took much less time to learn new pieces towards the end of the year.

It has been a wonderful experience working with LVM and I feel I’ve really learnt a lot about rehearsing singers and a choir efficiently and effectively, and I’m glad to have learnt this in such an encouraging environment too! I got to conduct a few performances in the last concert, but I would say the most enjoyable and most rewarding part of the role was seeing the choir grow musically – it’s really encouraging as a conductor to see the musicians grow in confidence and musicianship together. It’s really helped my musicianship personally, and most importantly I now consider myself to be a singer. I am sad to be leaving this position, but strongly believe the choir is going from strength to strength.

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Vacancy – Piano Accompanist

Looking for choral accompaniment experience with a established and expanding local choir? Look no further – Leeds Vocal Movement is recruiting!

We are currently accepting applications for a Piano Accompanist. This is now a paid position for a budding professional pianist, to join us from September 2018 to July 2019.

We are looking for a well-organised musician with a keen focus on improving their accompanying skills and willingness to commit to the development of the choir. LVM’s mission is to improve musical education and create community through choral singing, and we need an accompanist who can internalise and apply those values in the role.

To find out more about LVM’s aims and operations, please visit our ‘About Us’ page. 

The candidate must be a University of Leeds student with Grade 8 Piano, preferably a first-study pianist.

To apply for the position, please download our application pack.

The deadline for applications is 12 noon on Tuesday 21st August 2018.

Interviews will be held on Thursday 30th August 2018.

If you have any questions about about the choir or the position, please contact Caitlin (Musical Director) or Rosa (Choir Manager) via email: leedsvocalmovement@gmail.com

Librarian's corner, Uncategorized

Librarian’s Corner: Shenandoah

About Librarian’s Corner:

Leeds Vocal Movement loves to sing music from a wide range of genres, and my aim is to better understand what we are singing. This blog adds some context and analysis to the notes on the page, for the benefit of members and listeners alike!

Shenandoah – traditional (arr. James Erb)

Shenandoah is widely regarded as one of America’s most popular and well-recognised folk songs.[1] Folk songs are known to be fluid in origin and meaning, and this one is no different; however, where its lyrics and melody have shifted, its connotations of heartache for a person or place have remained a staple of its character.

Shenandoah’s roots

The first mention of Shenandoah was said to be in the early 1800s. Some scholars have suggested that the song originally referred to the life of legendary mountaineer and trapper Jim Bridger, while others have traced its roots back to slave workers, akin to African spirituals.[2] However, it is most widely accepted that the song came from the American and Canadian fur traders; the Canadian fur traders, known as voyeurs, were well known for their singing, and songs such as Shenandoah floated down trade routes like the Missouri and Mississippi rivers. The song was eventually picked up by other boatmen and sailors throughout the 19th century, and became a sea shanty sung across the world.[3]

Although many attribute Shenandoah to a place or river, is widely regarded that the song’s title originally referred to the Oneida chief, John Shenandoah. Shenandoah was well celebrated in American history; he co-founded what is now known as Hamilton College in New York, and supported the colonials in the Seven Years War and American Revolutionary War.[4] In addition, he is said to be the namesake of the Shenandoah River and Valley in West Virginia.[5]

A song of longing

As is traditional for folk songs, Shenandoah has many different versions of its lyrics; earlier versions of the song depict the singer as a boatman, who is in love with Shenandoah’s daughter, Sally:

“O, Shenandoah, I love your daughter,

Away you rolling river.

I’ll take her ‘cross yon rolling water.”

Ah-ha, I’m bound away, ‘Cross the wide Missouri.[6]

However, more recent versions of the song, including James Erb’s arrangement, have removed the love story from the lyrics. Without this romantic narrative, the singer seems to direct their focus simply towards ‘Shenandoah’:

Oh Shenandoah,

I long to see you,

Away you rolling river.

Oh Shenandoah,

I long to see you,

Away, I’m bound away

‘Cross the wide Missouri.[7]

As Shenandoah is more commonly known as a place than a person, many have interpreted the lyrics to be yearning for the Shenandoah River or Valley, or used it as a metaphor for a familiar place. David Cheal notes that, while object of yearning open to interpretation, the idea of missing that object is still prevalent:

“Some versions…seem to be more about longing for a place than for a person. It’s a leaving song.”[8]

Erb’s rolling river

There are many choral arrangements of Shenandoah, but James Erb’s arrangement stands out as an homage to the boatmen that sang it, and the rivers that carried it. This is evident from the piece’s first two verses; the first verse is sung with the upper voices, and the second with the lower voices. The distance between these ranges mirrors the distance between the singer and the object of their longing, unable to bridge the gap between them.

Erb’s use of harmony and texture reflects the idea of hearing a song echoing down a river; the piece starts with the melody in unison and doesn’t introduce harmony until the third verse. It then ends with a gradual diminuendo, as each voice part eventually lands on the same sustained note. The slowly growing and thinning harmony imitates the way in which a listener would hear the song, drifting in and out of earshot as it passes them.

The texture in the middle verses seem to portray the movement of the river itself. The top melody floats above the steady harmonies in the lower parts, and later the three higher vocal parts sing the melody and harmony with staggered entrances. Together with the arching motifs and suspensions in the melody, the rippling waves of the “rolling river” can be distinctly heard in the piece, rising and breaking above the strong undercurrent of the sustained notes in the lower voices.

With these aspects in mind, the detail in the structure and dynamics of Erb’s arrangement can be interpreted to reflect the setting in which the song was first popularised: a bittersweet melody floating gently down a river.

Shenandoah today

Shenandoah has been a popular American folksong from the late 19th century, particularly as a favourite in public schools.[9]  The earliest recordings date back to the 1930s by singers such as Paul Robeson, and later sung by folk artists including Bob Dylan, The Corries and Jayne Stone. Shenandoah has also exceeded its folk genre, through numerous performances and recordings by singers such as Bing Crosby, Hayley Westenra and Keith Richards.[10]

The piece is also a choir favourite, with many choral versions of Shenandoah sung on an international scale. The Mormon Tabernacle Choir[11] and Voces8[12] are among the most recent choirs to record the folksong, continuing to immortalise its somewhat haunting melody in a range of different arrangements. However its origins and lyrics are interpreted, Shenandoah is sure to remain a beloved part of American folk music for generations to come.

Written by Rosa Stevens – Choir Manager and Librarian

Reference list

[1] https://www.loc.gov/creativity/hampson/about_shenandoah.html

[2] Cheal, David. 2017. ‘Shenandoah — a song steeped in history and mystery’. Financial Times. Available here.

[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_Shenandoah

[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skenandoa

[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skenandoa

[6] Ships, Sea Songs and Shanties. Collected by W. B. Whall, Master Mariner. First Edition 1910, Glasgow; Third Edition, 1913. Available here.

[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_Shenandoah#cite_note-whall-1

[8] Cheal, 2017.

[9]W. B. Whall, 1913.

[10] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oh_Shenandoah

[11] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GtwNJf3EK4

[12] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8xbY9Iyxpo

Feature image source: https://bit.ly/2l2DXtl 

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Vacancy – Apprentice Conductor

*THIS IS NOW A PAID POSITION*

Looking for conducting experience with a established and expanding local choir? Look no further – Leeds Vocal Movement is recruiting!

We are currently accepting applications for a new Apprentice Conductor. This is now a paid position for a budding conductor, to join us from September 2018 to July 2019.

We are looking for a well-organised musician with a keen focus on improving their conducting skills and willingness to commit to the development of the choir. LVM’s mission is to improve musical education and create community through choral singing, and we need an Apprentice Conductor who can internalise and apply those values in the role.

The candidate must be a final year university student or within three years of graduating.

This is our second year offering the position; our first Apprentice Conductor, Gregory Moor, joined LVM in January, and he has been a great asset to the choir. He debuted at our Summer Concert in June, and has enjoyed his time with us:

“I’m grateful for the opportunity to be the apprentice conductor for

Leeds Vocal Movement. It’s a welcoming community and very supportive

of each other, and I’m glad to have been a part of making the choir

what it is today!”

You can find out more about him on our ‘About Us’ page. 

To apply for the position, please download our application pack.

The deadline for applications is 12 noon on Tuesday 21st August 2018. 

Interviews will be held on Thursday 30th August 2018. 

If you have any questions about about the choir or the position, please contact Caitlin (Musical Director) or Rosa (Choir Manager) via email: leedsvocalmovement@gmail.com

joining the choir, SATB choir, Uncategorized

My Journey to LVM – Holly Angel

 

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Leeds Vocal Movement hard at work!

I have always loved to sing. When I was in primary school, Friday assemblies where everyone sang together were my favourite thing. I once got moved to the front of the group while rehearsing for a school play because I was singing so enthusiastically. I jumped at the chance to join my high school choir, and at sixteen I fell in love with Glee and Gareth Malone. When I joined university I couldn’t wait to join the choir. I was really surprised to be the only non-music student there. I had joined as an “enthusiastic amateur”, the person who loves something without understanding it. I couldn’t have told you what the musical terms meant (I’m a little better now) and if you asked me to sing you a G sharp I’d have no idea (still don’t!) but it was there that I first fell in love with choral music. It was divine, passionate, emotive, and utterly moving. I loved it.

When I graduated university in 2013 and moved back to my home city, Leeds, I was looking for a new choir. I did some googling of Leeds choirs and was disappointed but not surprised to find so many choirs were either up to the age of 18 or didn’t have a specific age but consisted of people who were in their 50s, 60s, 70s…where was the choir for young adults? Luckily, I happened to find one that fit the bill – Leeds Vocal Movement.
Leeds Vocal Movement would generally be considered a small choir – I think the most we’ve ever boasted is roughly 35 members. But what has never been small is the passion! While my university choir introduced me to the wonders of choral music – Handel, Faure, Britten – this choir has introduced me to a much wider range since then – folk songs, contemporary covers, traditional pieces and modern choral music (Eric Whitacre is a choir staple!). It’s hard to pick one favourite piece because there have been so many great ones, but a standout piece for me is one called “Name That Tune” by Grayston Ives. It’s a mashup of multiple classical pieces – Beethoven, Mozart, Strauss. It took the choir a good six months to perfect it, and there were so many laughs along the way as we fluffed different parts. We really made it our own, and that’s one of the most special things about being in a choir to me – taking a piece, adding unique touches to it and having a lot of fun along the way!
I was asked to manage social media not long after I joined the choir and it was a really fun challenge thinking about different ways to sum up rehearsals with pictures, videos and tweets. It’s no easy feat trying to raise the choir’s profile without the money for a marketing campaign but over the five years I’ve been working on it I think our name is gradually becoming more known through Leeds and hopefully will continue to do so.
During my time in the choir we’ve worked hard to give something special to our audiences, whether that’s creating a Christmassy atmosphere and bringing a smile to passers by as we carol to raise money for different charities, or our own concerts that we strive to fill with a variety of musical styles so that there will be something for everyone to enjoy. As much as we get out of performing for others, we also gain so much ourselves, from learning different musical techniques (such as Kodaly) from our conductor, to understanding more about what we really love to sing as a choir and as individuals. So much of the fun is that you never stop learning and growing!
Leeds Vocal Movement has been a wonderfully unique choir to be part of – relatively new (less than ten years old), young adult, secular and unauditioned – brimming with people of different skill levels and musical experience but all bursting with the same musical passion. I’m proud to have watched it grow and change over the years and I hope it will long continue to provide a place for young people in Leeds who love to sing with somewhere to go and express themselves and share the joy of music with others, both members and an audience.
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LVM is a charity – and here’s why

We are delighted to announce that Leeds Vocal Movement became a registered charity on 26th February 2018. This is wonderful news for the choir, as it opens up a lot of opportunities for its development. We would like to ensure that these opportunities are clearly outlined for our members, local public and anyone who is interested in the status and long-term growth of the choir.

Our Objectives

The Charity Commission recognises the following objectives for the choir:

  1. For the public benefit to advance the musical education (including practical and theoretical musical training) of people aged between 18 and 35 years in and around Leeds.
  2. To advance, improve, develop and maintain public engagement in, and appreciation of, the art and science of music, through choir performances, workshops and rehearsals.

Why have we become a charity?

As a registered charity, LVM has public recognition as an organisation, with social benefits and public needs at the forefront of our aims and developments; we will use these to directly benefit our choir members and the local community, and our charity status guarantees this.

Being a charity also improves our ability to meet these objectives, through increasing our opportunities for funding our core and project-based costs. This keeps our choir affordable, without compromising the development of its members and quality of its events.

What does this mean for members?

Education: LVM provides musical education, guidance and practice at our rehearsals, which are led by our professional Musical Director Caitlin Mayall. Caitlin’s enthusiastic approach, and application of the Kodály method to musical education, allows each member to advance in their musical knowledge and skill at a crucial stage in their vocal development.

Diversity: We pride ourselves on providing a diverse selection on music from a wide range of musical genres to sing each term. Our Musical Director and Librarian work hard to make our repertoire as eclectic as possible. We also encourage our members to suggest pieces for the choir to sing (and what not to sing), as it’s a priority for our members to enjoy what they’re performing.

Development: our long-term project for the choir is to provide more musical education for our members, with the following aims:

  1. To run high-quality choral workshops from visiting conductors and vocal leaders
  2. To develop the Kodály Method music training programme for LVM members and the wider choral community in Leeds
  3. To provide an accompanying pianist, to provide exciting concert opportunities for SATB and piano

Opportunities: Members will have the opportunity to perform in the LVM concerts twice a year, as well as singing in collaborative concerts, festivals and competitions with other choirs in the arts community. In each of our concerts, our members have the chance to sing full choir and small ensemble pieces, both of which allow them to enhance their experience of performing music.

What does this mean for the local community?

Accessibility: We often gain members who haven’t sung in a choir for many years, or at all. For this reason, we do not have the barrier of auditioning or prior experience as a requirement for joining, as it can put people off before they’ve had a chance to sing with us. In addition, we offer subsidised membership fees for students and those on a low income, to make our choir affordable for our target audience.

Engagement: We often host open rehearsals during recruitment periods, to give individuals the opportunity to try out our choir first before joining; potential members and interested friends/colleagues can join us for an evening of singing, and see if LVM is right for them. Our choral workshops are also available for the public to participate, and join our members in developing their vocal knowledge and technique.

Community: All who join LVM are welcomed into a community of singers and music-lovers of varying musical abilities, knowledge and culture. Our members are a mixture of students and working professionals, which span our target age range and a wealth of careers and interests. We maintain this community outside of our weekly rehearsals, whether through social media, blog posts, choir socials, or just a post-rehearsal pint.

Entertainment: The musical education and guidance provided by our Musical Director, and the dedication of the choir, are best showcased in our concerts and performances. Our audience members can expect an evening of diverse and well-rehearsed repertoire, sung by a choir that continually strives for musical excellence.

What does this mean in relation to funding?

LVM’s core costs are always growing and currently being funded by members’ fees only. As a newly registered charity, we are constantly applying for sponsorship and arts funding to help us to cover costs such as our rehearsal venue, paying our Musical Director and hiring/purchasing music to perform.

We are also applying for project funding for the development our choir, the aims of which are outlined above. Our projects include our termly choir workshops, and the employment of an Apprentice Conductor and Piano Accompanist, which give early-career musicians an opportunity to gain paid experience in their field.

Any donations we receive, large or small, will help us provide excellent choral training for the members of our choir. If you are interested in funding, sponsoring or donating to our choir, please contact us via email or donate to our GoFundMe campaign.

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Librarian’s Corner: Vuelie

About Librarian’s Corner:

Leeds Vocal Movement loves to sing music from a wide range of genres, and my aim is to better understand what we are singing. This blog adds some context and analysis to the notes on the page, for the benefit of members and listeners alike!

Vuelie – Frode Fjellheim (2015)

 

This entry contains mentions of the songs and events in the film Frozen.

Frode Fjellheim’s ‘Vuelie’ first grabbed listeners’ attention in 2015, as the opening song of Disney’s Frozen. Both the film and its soundtrack are recognised world-wide, and ‘Vuelie’ has gained particular attention due to its tribe-like sounds of Scandinavian origin.

The Song of the Earth

‘Vuelie’ is adapted from the piece ‘Eatnemen Vuelie’,[1] translated as ‘Song of the Earth’. This piece is known as a yoik or vuelie, traditionally sung by the Sami people.[2] Yoik music is written to replicate the sounds of nature, as Ursula Länsman explains:

“A yoik is not merely a description; it attempts to capture its subject in its entirety: it’s like a holographic, multi-dimensional living image, a replica, not just a flat photograph or simple visual memory. It is not about something, it is that something.”[3]

In ‘Eatnemen Vuelie’, the sounds of the Earth are expressed through pure vocals in the upper voices, and homogenous chanting in the lower voices. Norwegian composer Frode Fjellheim[4] also added lyrics of the hymn ‘Fairest Lord Jesus’ to the original yoik, which describes Jesus as the “ruler of all nature”.

After being approached by Disney to include the piece in Frozen, Fjellheim adapted ‘Eatnemen Vuelie’ with film composer Christophe Beck, by shortening the piece and removing the lyrics. However, the the yoik melody and indigenous sound is carefully preserved in the film.[5]

The yoik in Frozen

‘Vuelie’[6] is the very first experience in the film Frozen, its opening bars heard against a blank screen before accompanying the opening credits.[7] After it finishes, the men of Arendelle sing about their work on the glaciers in ‘Heart’.[8]  The two opening songs, including the indigenous sounds of Scandinavia that ‘Vuelie’ provides, give the audience an initial understanding of the film’s setting, community and cultural associations. This technique is well practiced by Disney composers; similar songs can be heard in the opening scenes of such films as Pocahontas,[9] Lilo and Stitch[10] and The Lion King.[11]

Much like The Lion King, Frozen uses a reprise of its opening song to celebrate the return of normality to the community. In ‘Vuelie’s reprise, ‘The Great Thaw’,[12] string, brass and woodwind instruments are slowly introduced to the vocals, and the piece increases in texture and volume to signify the restoration of Arendelle. Both pieces show the importance of ‘Vuelie’, not only as the spirit of Arendelle, but the sound of familiarity, safety and contentment within the film.

The sound of Norway

‘Vuelie’ has maintained its cultural relevance outside of its Disney narrative, by Norwegian female choir Cantus. The choir originally recorded ‘Eatnemen Vuelie’ for their 2011 album, ‘Norwegian Voices’,[13] and later recorded ‘Vuelie’ and ‘The Great Thaw’ for the original Frozen soundtrack.

The choir have been celebrated as depicting the hidden voices of Norway, with a pure vocal sound that complements traditional Nordic singing; Kristin Asdal describes Cantus’ sound as “heavenly voices…with steady chanting reminiscent of repetitive rain or snow, mimicking the sounds of nature”.[14] The choir have solidified this legacy through their album ‘Northern Lights’, released in 2017, with ‘Vuelie’ as the lead track.

Whether recognised as a traditional yoik or the opening song in Frozen, ‘Vuelie’ is still celebrated years after its release by listeners worldwide.

Written by Rosa Stevens – Choir Manager and Librarian

Reference list

[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=114&v=LTNQAL4nV5A

[2] http://www.boosey.com/teaching/news/New-arrangements-of-Eatnemen-Vuelie-from-Disney-s-Frozen/100627

[3] https://www.laits.utexas.edu/sami/diehtu/giella/music/yoiksunna.htm

[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frode_Fjellheim

[5] http://animatedviews.com/2014/composer-frode-fjellheim-on-frozens-native-spirit/

[6] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zldOELlIXI4

[7] http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Vuelie

[8] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3t-cd4vMq6E

[9] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7v7m1XSrj6Q

[10] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KtsV4bWPHsY

[11] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwSKkKrUzUk

[12] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKe7ORhHMPo

[13] http://www.norwegianamerican.com/arts/29183/

[14] http://norwegianarts.org.uk/frozens-norwegian-choir-cantus-releases-new-album/

Feature image source: https://www.musixmatch.com/lyrics/Christophe-Beck-Cantus-Frode-Fjellheim/Vuelie

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Caitlin Mayall: How I got into choral conducting and what LVM means to me!

I wasn’t always into choral music – I grew up loving jazz and spent a lot of time listening to Ella Fitzgerald in our family kitchen. I also started composing when I was 12, because I didn’t like practising scales on the piano and I used to turn them into different motifs and write lyrics to them. My mum encouraged me to join Stockport Youth Orchestra, where I messed around a lot because I didn’t like the screechy sound I made on the violin – but I met a friend there who convinced me to audition for the Hallé Youth Choir in Manchester which was where it all started.

Going to the Hallé was like getting an overdose injection of the musical bug. We were regular performers at the Bridgewater Hall and sang everything from Poulenc’s stunning ‘Gloria’ to Elgar part-songs to Mahler’s 2nd symphony. I remember sight-reading Bruckner’s ‘Locus Iste’ at Ampleforth College surrounded by friends, breaking into Lambert’s ‘The Rio Grande’ at regular intervals on a tour bus to Italy and marching through the streets of York singing a swingle singers arrangement of ‘I’ll Be There For You’ at the top of our lungs. Jamie Burton was our wonderfully eccentric and hugely inspiring director, who taught us to read music using Solfege sign language and who intrigued us with his knowledge of the composers whose works we were performing.

It’s because of this exposure to so much gorgeous, life-changing music as a teenager that now as an adult I feel determined to bring the same experiences to others. I found myself volunteering to direct LUUMS Chorus whilst at Leeds University and now I devote my time to teaching Kodály music in schools and leading children’s and youth choirs. As my personal experiences of music have been of high quality but also highly social, I believe choirs should be joyful and create community – whether they are amateur or semi-professional, young or old, sacred or secular – because that’s what lasts. Leeds Vocal Movement does just that, and it’s becoming part of a choral music revolution in our up-and-coming city which I want to help fuel.

Music, and the friends I’ve made through music, has been there for me in some form throughout the best and darkest moments of my life. There is a big difference though between experiencing music by listening to CD or going to a concert and actually being the music itself. It is far superior to share music with others and we can create much more variety as singers in a choir than alone. On that note, if you want to be part of a vibrant musical community which sings for pleasure and experiences a range of music from all genres, styles and periods, come along and sing with us on a Wednesday evening!

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Christmas concerts

We are very excited to announce our two upcoming Christmas concerts this year!

7.30pm, Saturday 16th December, Oxford Place Centre, Leeds

Come along to hear our exciting, jazzy Christmas repertoire including Follow That Star, Bethlehem Down, Coventry Carol, Away in a Manger, and some non-Christmas classics like Goodnight Sweetheart, Red Red Rose and many more!

You can buy tickets here or on the door – https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/lvm-christmas-concert-tickets-40033736985 

7.30pm, Monday 18th December, Left Bank, Leeds

We’re very excited to be joining Left Bank Vocal Collective in a joint concert and singing in this gorgeous building which began life as a church. We will be singing a variety of Christmassy and non-Christmassy songs.

You can find out more about Left Bank here – http://leftbankleeds.org.uk/